"The Opposite of War isn't Peace...It's Creation."

J. Slater Contemporary Artist- Chicago IL., New York, NY.
-Graduate of (SAIC) School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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4 Year Old Foils Babysitter’s Robbery Plot - Video

Let’s just blame the black guy…

believe a little girl in 30 seconds but won’t believe the black man after 5 hours….lol ok.

Says a lot.

It really does. I think it’s wonderful that she told that truth however, this is a prime example of white privilege. At 4 years old, she actually had systematic power over the fate of a Black male. White privilege is a very real and impactful thing.

I know that this story is heartwarming in it’s own way. Yes, the 4 year old has more in the way of ethical fiber in her pinky than her babysitter has in her whole body. Yes, it’s case closed on a wrongfully accused case that could have had very serious consequences for the neighbor involved…

but there’s something really chilling about an otherwise law abiding citizen being arrested and questioned in handcuffs for 5 hours on the casual implication of a 17 year old. 

Here for the comments, especially the last one.

(via howtobeterrell)

Did Ridley Scott’s “Exodus” movie give the Sphinx a white/European makeover?

The backlash against Ridley Scott’s Exodus is gathering momentum. After Noah’s mixed reception earlier this year, more and more people are sick of seeing movies with “whitewashed” casts: White actors representing historical figures who almost certainly were not white.

The latest accusation of Exodus whitewashing relates to someone who technically isn’t even a character: the Sphinx.

The likeliest explanation is that the sculpture in this picture is not the Sphinx, but is in fact a statue of Ramses. This means that it would have been based on actor Joel Edgerton’s face. 

Unfortunately, this just makes the whitewashed casting even more blatant, because real statues of Ramses II simply do not look like that. So while Exodus may not have made a “white version” of the Sphinx, Egyptian culture is still being erased and rewritten to fit in with the film’s predominantly white cast of actors.

[READ MORE]

(Source: hellotailor, via bitterseafigtree)

Black life is cheap in America. The historical irony is, of course, that the fluctuations in the value placed on black life, and the labor output it produced, were the basis of America’s economy for centuries.

The blues sensibility of black folks has made us very comfortable with death and suffering. In many ways, we are numb to it. Our numbness does not mean that we do not feel hurt, pain, suffering, or anger at how violence against the black body is a routine fixture in American culture.

America was and remains a lynching society—where black bodies were once hung from trees, burned alive, cut apart, or otherwise brutalized by blood thirsty white mobs comprised of men, women, and children, now black people are shot dead by white cops and white street vigilantes.

Numbness here is a lack of surprise at how white racism kills innocent black and brown people, and how then the latter are made into criminals, and those who commit the heinous act are somehow “victims” of “reverse racism”. The madness and insanity of colorblind racism in the post civil rights era is encapsulated by that process: America is so sick with white supremacy that calling white racists to account is somehow worse than the social evils they have committed.

White supremacy is a type of social insanity because through the deeply connected processes of the white racial frame, the White Gaze, and white privilege, it can invert and twist reality to suit the agenda of those who have, what George Lipsitz famously described as, a “possessive investment in whiteness”.

Eric Garner’s killing by the New York Police Department was videotaped. Like the decades-earlier Rodney King case, the visual reference should provide indisputable evidence of white on black police brutality. And as it did in the King case, white racist logic transforms the indisputable and obvious into doubt.